Country-wise Listing - Tanzania

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S.NO Title & Authors Name page
1
A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY ON AVAILABILITY OF ESSENTIAL MEDICINES AND BASIC DIAGNOSTIC EQUIPMENTS IN TANZANIA
Henry Irunde, Omary Minzi, and Candida Moshiro
 Abstract                  View                 Download                 XML

The objective of this study was to determine availability of medicines and diagnostic equipments in public and private health care facilities in Tanzania. Four regions participated in the study and for each region, two districts were randomly chosen, one rural and one urban, in which 67 health facilities were drawn studied. Sixteen medicines were picked from National Essential Medicines List and ten diagnostic equipments were selected and their availability determined. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16.0 SPSS, Inc. Chicago, USA, was used to analyse data. Mean availability of medicines was 80% in studied facilities; regional mean availability of medicines was 86% for Dar es Salaam, 82% for Kilimanjaro, 85% for Mbeya, and 70% for Mwanza. Availability of diagnostic equipments in consultation rooms was 39% (N=143). Availability of medicines and diagnostic equipments in studied health facilities were sub-optimal and interventions to address the situation are required.

201-209
2
REFORMING SUPPORTIVE SUPERVISION OF MEDICINES MANAGEMENT WITH AN AUDIT TOOL IN PRIMARY HEALTH CARE FACILITIES: A CASE STUDY OF BAHI DISTRICT, TANZANIA
Ntuli Kapologwe, Amani Thomas Mori, Fiona Chilunda, Menoris Meshack, Albino Kalolo, Karin Wiedenmayer
 Abstract                  View                 Download                 XML
Stock-out of essential medicines is a common problem in primary health facilities of Tanzania. Alternative approaches such as the use of auditing tools have been proposed in order to strengthen the generally weak supportive supervision in medicines management. A cross-sectional study was conducted in ten primary health facilities in Bahi District in Dodoma region-Tanzania between October and December, 2013. Standardized auditing tools and indicators were used to assess the availability of ten essential tracer medicines, timeliness and correctness of ordering, record keeping, documentation and financial management. Analysis was done by using MS Excel spreadsheet (Microsoft Excel® , Microsoft Corporation). Mean availability of tracer medicines was 84%. Rapid Diagnostic Tests for malaria, artemether-lumefantrine, amoxicillin syrup and amoxicillin capsules were mostly found to be out of stock. Nine of the ten facilities submitted their ordering forms on time but only six of the ten facilities filled their ordering forms correctly. In five facilities, financial records did not balance with bank statements and receipt books. Medicines audits represent a feasible approach to strengthen medicines management at primary health facilities. The study validated standardized and simple tools that can be used to reform routine supportive supervision methodology.
108-114
3
MEDICINE STOCK OUT AND INVENTORY MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS IN PUBLIC HOSPITALS IN TANZANIA: A CASE OF DAR ES SALAAM REGION HOSPITALS
*Godeliver A.B. Kagashe and Terevael Massawe
 Abstract                  View                 Download                 XML
The supply of medicines needs to be managed efficiently in order to prevent all types of wastage including overstocking, pilferage and expiry. This wastage may influence the quality of health care provided to patients. Problems of stock outs or overstocking and expiry of medicines in public hospitals in Tanzania have been reported. Factors contributing to these stock outs on one hand and over stocking on the other are not very clear. This descriptive cross sectional study therefore assessed the logistic skill levels of personnel involved in medicines supply as well as inventory management of medicines in public hospitals in Dar es Salaam region. Data was obtained using questionnaires as well as record review of tracer medicines. Results show that logistic skill level was poor and inventories were not well managed. Lack of funds and poor logistic skills contributed to stock outs. It is recommended that personnel dealing with medicines supply be trained in procurement and inventory management. <br />
252-259