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Country-wise Listing - Uruguay

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S.NO Title & Authors Name page
1
SAFE USE OF A DAILY 20-MG DOSE OF OMEPRAZOLE IN ORDER TO AVOID HYPOMAGNESEMIA
Cecilia Maldonado; Nicolas de Mello;Pietro Fagiolino; Marta Vazquez
 Abstract                  View                 Download                 XML
The objective of the current study was to examine the safe use of a daily standard dose of omeprazole (20 mg) regarding magnesium levels in blood in hospitalized patients. A total of 51 patients (15 women, 36 men) with different characteristics (pathologies, comedications, age, habits, etc) and taking a standard dose of omeprazole for more than three months were included. 17.6 % of the patients showed mild hypomagnesemia but we concluded that the observed low levels of this electrolyte could be attributed to comedications, age and different pathologies rather than the 20-mg dose of omeprazole. So, hypomagnesemia does not eliminate proton-pump inhibitors as a reasonable option; it just requires clinicians to be aware of this problem and use them safely at conventional doses.
315-321
2
SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF EFAVIRENZ AFTER A SINGLE–DOSE BIOEQUIVALENCE STUDY: A TREND TO CORRELATE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM EFFECT AND PLASMA CONCENTRATION
Marta Vazquez; Pietro Fagiolino; Manuel Ibarra; Laura Magallanes
 Abstract                  View                 Download                 XML
The objective of the current study was to examine safety and pharmacokinetic data obtained from a bioequivalence study of two brands of efavirenz carried out in healthy volunteers in order to assess the relationship between concentrations and appearance of adverse events. Drowsiness was reported in almost all the subjects 1 or 2 hours post dosing and generally the onset of this adverse event was 30 or 40 minutes before high efavirenz plasma concentrations, evidencing a lag time between venous plasma concentration and effect. As many studies reported, arterial drug concentration is higher than the respective venous concentration during drug inputs so adverse events experienced during drug input would correlate with arterial drug concentration rather than the respective venous concentration.
46-52